Short Term Rental Regulations

What are short term rentals?

Generally speaking, a short term rental is a residential property in which a property owner (host) rents a room, rooms, or an entire property to a guest(s) for a fee for less than 30 consecutive nights. Short term rentals are not new, but the growth in home-sharing through online platforms has increased. Examples of on-line platforms include AirBnB, HomeAway and VRBO.

How does the City of Olympia address short term rentals?

The Washington State Legislature adopted regulations for short term rentals in 2019 (House Bill 1798). The City of Olympia currently doesn't have specific regulations addressing short term rentals, however, the City is taking a closer look at these rentals to establish rules that are balanced and equitable for all lodging businesses.

Other cities have taken a variety of approaches to regulating short term rentals, and we need your help to develop a sound process for Olympia that:

  • Aligns with Olympia’s context and priorities
  • Protects public and private interests
  • Promotes fairness
  • Helps meet our social and economic needs

We need your input!

The City has identified the following six goals for short term rental regulations.

  1. Housing: Establish protections for the supply and affordability of housing
  2. Health and Safety: Identify unwanted behaviors and negative consequences
  3. Neighborhood Integrity: Minimize impacts and tensions between short term rentals and neighbors
  4. Fees and Taxes: Ensure equitable permit and tax compliance
  5. Enforcement: Enact enforceable policies that improve building, safety, and accessibility requirements
  6. Economic Development: Ensure an equitable approach with existing local firms and providers and their employees, and enable revenue opportunities for existing residents

Let us know what you think about each of these goals using the following tools below.

  • Comments: Tell us what you think about the six goals for short term rental regulations.
  • Stories: Share your stories about living near, staying in or operating a short term rental.


What are short term rentals?

Generally speaking, a short term rental is a residential property in which a property owner (host) rents a room, rooms, or an entire property to a guest(s) for a fee for less than 30 consecutive nights. Short term rentals are not new, but the growth in home-sharing through online platforms has increased. Examples of on-line platforms include AirBnB, HomeAway and VRBO.

How does the City of Olympia address short term rentals?

The Washington State Legislature adopted regulations for short term rentals in 2019 (House Bill 1798). The City of Olympia currently doesn't have specific regulations addressing short term rentals, however, the City is taking a closer look at these rentals to establish rules that are balanced and equitable for all lodging businesses.

Other cities have taken a variety of approaches to regulating short term rentals, and we need your help to develop a sound process for Olympia that:

  • Aligns with Olympia’s context and priorities
  • Protects public and private interests
  • Promotes fairness
  • Helps meet our social and economic needs

We need your input!

The City has identified the following six goals for short term rental regulations.

  1. Housing: Establish protections for the supply and affordability of housing
  2. Health and Safety: Identify unwanted behaviors and negative consequences
  3. Neighborhood Integrity: Minimize impacts and tensions between short term rentals and neighbors
  4. Fees and Taxes: Ensure equitable permit and tax compliance
  5. Enforcement: Enact enforceable policies that improve building, safety, and accessibility requirements
  6. Economic Development: Ensure an equitable approach with existing local firms and providers and their employees, and enable revenue opportunities for existing residents

Let us know what you think about each of these goals using the following tools below.

  • Comments: Tell us what you think about the six goals for short term rental regulations.
  • Stories: Share your stories about living near, staying in or operating a short term rental.


What do you think about the above six goals for short-term rental regulations?

CLOSED: This portion of the comment period has closed

i am a resident and home owner in the city of Olympia. I have limited concerns about short term rentals (at this time). #5 is the area I would like to see addressed. Registration of short term rentals, inspection of such units and accessibility, safety and maintaining the building and lot. Fee to be charged to cover costs of these inspections. I regards to affordable housing, ALL of Thurston county should allow an ADU to be built on each property with a 10 year property tax exemption on the ADU. Provided such ADU is NOT used for short term housing.

JAKJ about 18 hours ago

Do impede on contract workers who want the ability to stay in a fully furnished place without a long term rental agreement. They are taking housing from people who actually want to stay here and make this a nice city to live in long-term.

citizenfox 2 days ago

Stop building intentional slums as 'affordable' housing. Tax rentals to get landlords out of the market and give incentives to high quality construction.

citizenfox 2 days ago

As a person who lives here and sincerely wants this city to be a good place to live more than a good place for outsiders to prey, I will address the six goals mentioned above.1. Housing for profit means homelessness and losses to the local economy. Many owners do not live here. We already have a problem with too many rentals. STR makes this worse.2. Many of these short term rentals are obvious fronts for short term girlfriend. This is not healthy or safe for the residents who live here.3. Residential zones should be for residents. Short term visitors belong in Hotels, not neighborhoods.4. Tax rentals so that they cost far more per month than a mortgage, without passing that money to the landlord(keep it in the government). Landlorlds will target other cities. Residents will see housing become more affordable.5. Taxing All rentals is enforceable. Keeping visitors in hotels is enforceable enough, and prevents prostitution posing as rentals.6. All rentals drive up housing prices. Are you sincere about affordable housing? Tax all rentals. Stop letting residintial zones turn into businesses and tourist havens, driving up the cost of living. Even rental prices will drop because housing costs will drop. An economy that depends on rentals is a really bad long-term plan. The best economy to live in is based on resources, production, and services-for-local-residents. Short term rentals encourage tourism and real-estate speculators, which are not useful to the majority of people who live here.

citizenfox 2 days ago

I am fully supportive of Olympia having Airbnb STR with the least amount of regulations. If the City develops reasonable regulations, then I think the HOAs around town should follow the new regulations instead of completely prohibiting Airbnb. I agree with others who have asserted it is usually ridiculously paranoid neighbors who object to Airbnb.

Theresa Madden 3 days ago

The city should stay out of regulating small-scale and backyard lodging . It's a private matter between people not a matter for the government. Regulation creates public costs for the regulation process and the enforcement process and frankly the municipal government of Olympia can not even keep up with basic sanitation and nuisance use throughout the city,Revisit this issue in 2030, until then it is an non-issue and not germane to a healthy community.Without municipal regulation, at worst it will provide housing for folks and create an opportunity for more folks to come and stay and enjoy our community.

olybuzz 3 days ago

I'm pondering building a small house in my backyard, which is in a highly desirable neighborhood close to the Capitol. I have plenty of space to do so (indeed, there used to BE a house back there). Also, I own a second home in New Orleans, which is a city that relies on tourism and has struggled mightily with AirBnB. While I do not AirBnB my second home out, I have personally witnessed what investors (buying up homes there with intention to short-term rent only) has done to the neighborhoods. But - while I never (before purchase of that home) stayed at an AirBnb in New Orleans, I have stayed at them in other places I have traveled. With that as a basis, here are some brief comments.For Olympia, this seems like a solution in search of a problem. I'm very aware we have a homelessness crisis, and a housing affordability problem. I'd just like to see the DATA that sits behind an assertion that it's STR operators that are causing it, or, even contributing to it in any major way. From reading the comments already made below, it seems very much to me like most of the STR renters are saying they would not make their properties (rooms or separate dwellings) available for long term rent. If that's truly the case, further regulating the STRs that exist doesn't seem like it would make any kind of dent on goal #1. If Olympia was a tourist mecca like New Orleans, it might, but that is simply not the case here. My perception (again, it'd be great if there was actual DATA involved), is that our housing affordability issue has more to do with workers being priced out of Seattle competing for our housing stock than it does with STRs.As far as goals 2, and 4-6 - I am not a landlord here and so am relatively blissfully unaware of existing rules/regs around these issues for rentals. Are there some? I know that in the past when there've been 'unwanted behaviors' and/or 'negative consequences' at long term rental properties down the street, the regulations/enforcement really don't seem to be...in existence or very hard to pin down. I think, as these goals relate to goal 1 - Olympia could perhaps benefit by improving regulations on existing LONG term rentals (of which there are far more) than by spending focus on the relatively small number of SHORT term rentals we have. Again, if there's data that will prove that my perceptions in this area are wrong, I'd love to see it.Regarding goal 3: As I say above, I have seen how AirBnb has adversely impacted several popular New Orleans neighborhoods. Initially the city regulated them, made STR owners apply for permits, get inspections etc. and then, on Dec 1, they basically rolled back the part of their licensing that allowed whole-home rentals. The only way you can now rent out a whole-home for a short-term rental in New Orleans is now if you live on the premises and have a homestead exemption (legal proof that you do live on the premises, like if you are in one half of the duplex, you could rent the other half out or if you have an ADU, you could rent it out). I fully support this move even tho, as investors who snapped up houses are now dumping them back onto the market, it has adversely impacted the resale value of my own house there. Walking thru my neighborhood there, as these houses were bought up with the sole intention of STR (and indeed, converting them from single family homes or long term rentals INTO STRs), became a radically different experience for me. No longer were there folks hanging out on their porch stoops to chat with, or cats/dogs that I'd come to know from my walks - this was replaced with empty porches and visions of tourists arriving or departing with luggage. That HAS adversely impacted various New Orleans neighborhoods - which is why I fully support their new regulation. Again, however - New Orleans is a tourist destination and Olympia is NOT. It is highly unlikely - except perhaps in the South Capitol or along the waterfront - that investors would be buying up property for the sole purpose of short-term rental. Indeed, this issue has come up with when lobbyist organizations have bought up a handful of homes in the South Cap - which happens to be my neighborhood. If Olympia MUST insist on regulating STRs, then this - the whole-home rental WHEN a property is sold to a new owner - is where they should focus as this legitimately does take a unit out of availability for 'regular folk' who live here and does have the potential for compromising neighborhood integrity. In New Orleans, they also tried to limit the number of STRs you could have in each block, but that was much less effective than focus on whole-home rentals.As an aside, I very much want to build a small house in my backyard precisely so that I could live in it part time and rent out my existing larger house. If Oly wants to establish more infill - it'd be great if you'd focus on removing regulatory barriers and consider financial incentives for folks like me who have the space and are trying to do the right thing. That'd help your goal 1 more than focusing on STR stuff.

MG-SCap 3 days ago

My wife and I have been and Airbnb hosts in West Olympia for almost 6 years. During that time, we've experienced one government intervention - the levying of extra taxes (lodging taxes) on our Airbnb income. Although we weren't expecting this extra tax, we believe it's fair as we are actually competing with hotels who pay these same taxes. However, adding more governmental requirements and red tape will not do us any good and will not enhance the experience of our customers. Things are very agreeable to us as-is. But, we are only speaking from our personal experience. Also, we live 100 yards outside the city limit so we aren't sure if if any new city regulations will apply to us. Thanks for giving us the opportunity to voice our thoughts!

Doug Spohn 4 days ago

Feedback on the 6 goals~1. Housing: Establish protections for the supply and affordability of housingThis seems very important and from what I understand STR have a minimal effect on this. 55% of Olympia housing is LTR while 0.05% is STR. It seems different actions need to be taken to increase the amount of affordable homes available as 0.05% is a pretty small amount. This is currently not an issue.2. Health and Safety: Identify unwanted behaviors and negative consequencesSTR are a self regulating industry as they run on public reviews of past guests. The guests themselves are also reviewed so host have the opportunity to refuse guests who have been disrespectful in the past (who wants to host folks who will damage their property?). A vast majority of the time guests are far more respectful than long term renters. In the off instance where there is an issue it is in the hosts best interested to address the issue. Communication (not regulation) is the key.3. Neighborhood Integrity: Minimize impacts and tensions between short term rentals and neighborsI would offer that STR are not the problem between neighbors. Some neighbors cannot be appeased no matter the actions taken. History shows that how the property is being used is not the issue but rather rigid neighbors who cannot accept change and simply do not agree on the same ideas (which is not a requirement of living side by side). Again, a vast majority of neighbors are grateful that the property has been taken from an absolute dump which housing transients and druggies and turned into a beautiful property with folks who have come to enjoy Olympia.4. Fees and Taxes: Ensure equitable permit and tax complianceThe platform through which guests book collect and submit taxes on the part of the host. Not an issue.5. Enforcement: Enact enforceable policies that improve building, safety, and accessibility requirementsSTR and LTR should be held to the same policies and enforcement efforts. Currently Olympia has a difficult time keeping up with safe living conditions in LTR, that is an issue.6. Economic Development: Ensure an equitable approach with existing local firms and providers and their employees, and enable revenue opportunities for existing residentsSTR absolutely provide revenue opportunities to Olympians who are having a hard time making ends meet. Weekly I get messages as folks are looking for more work. I'm grateful when I can help.

OlyOpportunity 6 days ago

I've opened my home through Airbnb for 3.5 years. It has been a terrific experience hosting world wide travels. It would be very disappointing for the city or state to try and tangle the requirements in order to be an Airbnb host. Those of us hosting use this money for paying our enormous property taxes, making house repairs, helping fund kids in college and hopefully taking a vacation at some point. Airbnb has standards both for its rentals and hosts. They are very competent at ensuring landlords are neutral in opinions and do not discriminate for any reason. I have a room that is used by a lobbyist during session so he may have an affordable furnished room/cooking and laundry facilities. My kids are in college and the room is not available for long term rental as they are home for visits and breaks. Therefore, my room has very little impact on affordable housing. We have never had an issue with neighbors in 3 1/2 years of being a host. Taxes? I don't even collect enough money in the year to pay my annual property tax bill-you've about taxed us out of our home and this is how we are trying to have the money to pay them. Building safety/codes: if your home passed a certificate of occupancy it should be a reasonably safe place to live in. Please do not pass additional legislation/requirements for private homes who rent a room on a short term basis. It would be a devastation.

Teri, Boston Harbor Airbnb 6 days ago

Don't impede on contract workers who want the ability to stay in a fully furnished place without a long term rental agreement. They have money and contribute more to our community when their income isn't sucked dry by high housing costs.

Terry Taylor 7 days ago

I am an Airbnb host, and have been hosting travelers and folks visiting their families, etc for the past 4 years. The Airbnb space is a one room suite with a separate entrance from our home. I would NOT rent it long term if Airbnb was not possible, so there is no loss of long term housing to the community. We also save that space for our family members when they visit us. We are a single income family, I work in state government and my husband is disabled and unable to work outside the home. The modest sum we get from short term renting the Airbnb space is a critical component of our income and allows us to squeak by and provide a safe and warm space for our two young children. In the hundreds of guests that we have hosted in our 4 years, we have never had any troubles with them, nor have they troubled our neighbors. Guests are respectful, quiet, and clean.

Hannie1119 7 days ago

I have enjoyed being a host for Airbnb for about five years. I have also hosted legislative interns most winters and had short term room mates during this same period. Due to having guests throughout the year, adult children and relatives, my extra rooms are not available for long term rentals. There is no reduction in housing stick. Airbnb has been a great way to make a some extra money and be able to host guests from all over the globe. I’ve hosted over many people and rarely had a problem. Likewise, I’ve never had a guest cause any problems with my neighborhood or with my neighbors. I think for many people Airbnb is excellent for people with an extra room, not a business where developers can buy up houses and rent them, therefore I think limiting the quantity of units for rent should be a deciding factor in when the rules should change, maybe over three or five. At that point additional taxes and fees may be necessary. Absentee landlords can be a problem for both long and short term rentals. As far as accessible standards, Airbnb has a number of questions to see if your space is accessible(is there any steps? for example). Most houses are not accessible and when renting out some unusual spaces on my travels as well, I’ve enjoyed some quirky, not to code features. Sometimes that’s the fun.

Lynn Taylor 8 days ago

I agree with another poster who mentioned that there are many spaces that are or could be used for short-term rentals that might never be used for long-term rentals. We live in a multifamily house in the South Capitol Neighborhood and one of the units in our house is used by my retired parents every summer when they come up to the PNW to escape the heat. This unit will not be rented as a long-term rental and would either sit empty all winter or be used as a short-term rental. We, or course, prefer the option to be able to rent it out over the winter to travelers coming to Olympia for short stays, rather than letting it sit empty.

Cassandra 14 days ago

-current laws on the books for public nuisance and health and safety should be enough-current zoning for commercial use should regulate where -enforceable policies are wishful thinking when unrelated adults have been living in group --homes in this city for over 40 years with no enforcement-keep commercial apartments from being short term rentals such as 123 with lobbyists' rentals esp. those with tax defermentsthe city should listen to Neighborhood Associations for the "integrity" question - not come up with standards in a vacuum - and follow through with sincere effort to apply community generated criteria. I had airbnb in my home for 6 months and it was low impact with no complaints from my neighbors.-

Landtrust 16 days ago

I recently moved to the city and have a space with sep entrance I could turn into an AibBnb. There are several conclusions I feel you should avoid jumping too easily to. 1) that if not renting out short term, all Airbnb’s would be rented long term. For me and many others this is not the case. I want to use my space for family and friends and I do not want the risk of Long term tenancy. There is therefore zero chance I would ever do yearlong rentals in it. This is the case for many hosts. 2) That Airbnb’s create more issues for neighbors than homeowners or renters do. You would get all the same complaints if you asked about problems people have with homeowners, though of course you would have no reason to ask that. Too many cars too much noise poor upkeep. People who have we Airbnb (and I am in one is Europe as I write this) tend to follow rules or risk getting removed. This is not true of renters and owners. Make sure the impact you are addressing is real before you hit Airbnb’s with extra taxes, and find real ways to address housing shortages. The few complaining here could have been talking about any neighbor and the rest have been much more positive about the benefits.

SoCapResident about 1 month ago

Some basic observations to start with:Only goals 1 and 6 relate to deciding Olympia’s purpose in allowing and regulating short-term rentals. In fact, they present as likely Guiding Principles: to protect the supply and affordability of housing, and to ensure an equitable approach with existing local firms…and enable revenue opportunities for existing residents The rest of the “goals” are specific regulatory tasks, some of which would be unnecessary, depending on meeting Goals 1 and 6. To live up to Goal #1 as a guiding principle the city will have to adopt rules that ensure that suitable dwellings – apartments, ADUs, entire houses -- cannot be converted into year-round short-term rental businesses. Thus, the regulatory regime should provide that any resident could offer a short-term rental within their private residence or an associated ADU, but no one could convert a residence into a year-round short-term rental. This approach allows an existing resident to earn money from their home (Goal #6) in a way that protects housing and doesn’t conflict with traditional hospitality businesses (Goal #6). Regulation would thus be greatly simplified – requiring registration, and then simply addressing primarily safety, accessibility and insurance. Enforcement would need minimal staff, reducing the need for costly fees. The issue of unfair competition with traditional hospitality businesses could be eliminated entirely or limited: maybe to those renting an ADU and offering their residence on an STR basis for up to 6 months while they were absent.It is important to remember that every homeowner, absentee or otherwise; every landlord, every investor, etc. can still rent any dwelling unit on a 30-day or more basis without being licensed, taxed or subject to rules other than those that already apply to rentals. Thus, some housing units could be offered for a 30-day minimum basis and still be offered on STR platforms. (This is quite common.) Those housing units would not be available as traditional rentals.Market realities that affect housing supply and affordability The short-term rental of housing units affects both the supply and affordability of housing. CP&D Deputy Director Bauer in presenting infill zoning changes, told City Council members that the new rules could add 474 to 946 new housing units over the next 20 years. How many will be converted to Short Term Rentals if STRs are allowed year-round in entire units? Olympia’s rental market is tight already: According to Thurston Regional Planning, at 4% official the rental vacancy rate in Thurston County is below that of either Pierce or King County. Each house, apartment or ADU regularly offered as a short-term rental removes that unit from availability to a long-term tenant. The ability to derive income from a property raises its value, thus drives up the price for anyone competing to buy – or rent. Over time, supply diminishes or grows more slowly than otherwise; and prices rise above what they would be otherwise. Even though OMC 18.04.040 makes it illegal to convert residences into commercial uses, some have been converted. [Did the City of Olympia simply decide not to issue warnings or fines for these violations?] Without even trying, I know of two homes near me that are no longer available to families. In one, a couple purchased the house next door (with an ADU) and now make the two units available year-round as short-term rentals. In the other, a woman from Seattle purchased an older home, renovated it and now offers it on Airbnb. How many of the 167 STR listings identified by the city are offered year-round as entire units, not the primary residence of their owner(s)? That seems like an essential piece of information, you would want as part of your deliberations. The “marketplace” is already moving to convert more housing units to STR investments: …the Airbnb Rental Calculator allows you to evaluate how profitable a certain property is for an Airbnb investment. You can analyze the location, get real estate rental comps, and estimate your potential return on investment all in a matter of minutes! Click here to start analyzing Airbnb Washington State properties and find the best one to capitalize on.If the city chooses not to prohibit people from buying, renting and operating entire units as short-term rentals, the regulatory scheme will need to be much more complex. By default, Olympia will be participating in the transformation of neighborhoods – and the city itself -- via the creation of a new commercial business sector within residential districts: entire houses, apartments or ADUs owned by investors (in Olympia and elsewhere) for the primary goal of earning a profit. In a setting where year-round STRs operated by someone not residing on the property regulation will be more complex and demanding. A set of explicit regulations will be needed to achieve goals #2 through #5, along with a set of new city employees. Once this new business sector matures, the city will have an incentive to grow the tax revenue it receives – adding to the dynamic for a new pattern of neighborhood life.

Skeptical Olympian about 2 months ago

Goal 5 -Enforcement policies should also include impacts to neighborhood integrity. There should be consideration for if the short term rental has adequate parking. If there is not sufficient parking then available parking for residents of the neighborhood is taken away. For instance, if there is space in a house for eight people, there should be enough parking for four or five cars. There should be consideration of screening short-term rentals if they are providing an outdoor space with a barbecue or hot tub. Goal 2 -Owners should have policies posted on noise that comply with City and state regulation. Owners of the short-term unit should be registered with the City and their contact information should be readily available so that they can be contacted if there are problems with the unit. Better still require that the owner of the short term rental live onsite. Goal 6 - on Economic Development in a residential area an owner should not be allowed to have more than one short term rental on a property. If the owner rents out both a house and an airbnb, this turns a residential neighborhood into a commercial area. This is especially problematic if the owner is not onsite.

Sparrow 2 months ago

Short terms rentals are the best thing since sliced bread in my opinion. I do not own any STR's but have stayed in them a number of times and would welcome them into my neighborhood. As far as "Health and Safety" and "Neighborhood Integrity" concerns go, personally having an STR next door to me would be a HUGE improvement over some of the full time affordable housing renter neighbors that I now, and have had in the past. If people are complaining about the tensions they are having with their STR neighbors they should maybe experience having a full blown drug house next door with 30-40 very scary looking individuals in and out all day every day and god knows how many people living there at one time. My current neighor plays loud base and revs his little truck with no muffler for hours on end almost every day and into the middle of the night. I could go on and on about loud domestic violence and child neglect but this is just a short summary so I will spare all of the details. The OPD and City of Olympia couldn't seem care less about any of this happening or at least aren't even beginning to be willing to do anything about it so, what is the big deal with having these short term rentals here that are such a blessing to so many people? With short term rentals you may experience the occasional inconsiderate renter but they will soon leave, it is nothing like having one of those inconsiderate renters next door to you full time.

Jcause 2 months ago

We need to allow STR's, as they represent an important form of lodging in a city that wants to invite guests, tourists and legislative workers to visit. The unique nature of being a state capital city means short- to medium-term housing opportunities are required, beyond hotel/motel options. I worry less about the impacts they will have in our particular city, at this point in time (but believe we should have a regular interval of re-visiting the issue, as things change)...one, because we are poor at attracting tourists to our fair city (get rid of the ugly Marine Terminal and beautify our waterfront!!), and two, because with the looming Missing Middle (off-subject, but what a mess the City officials have made of this one!)--having STR's is a way of preserving critical buildings, in close-to-downtown neighborhoods which would otherwise be snapped up by developers wanting to put up expensive 4-plexes, cut down tree cover, etc. (which will themselves be used for much more aggressive forms of STR's potentially, which is why preserving the capability of the original homeowner to operate an STR both preserves the historic character of neighborhoods and also allows for small business opportunities for residents--not big business--to help pay mortgages.) STR's go in and out of being STR's.....preserving the original building is critical future housing opportunities for families wanting to live within the urban boundaries. I am concerned about Goal #6...who are we protecting there: Hotel chains? Sounds like a Chamber of Commerce goal, not a goal which residents would support....tho the last part of the sentence makes sense....'enable revenue opportunities for existing residents'...as long as those 'residents' are not big business operators. My assumption would be that taxes are gathered for STR's, not unlike any other lodging tax...seems to be the standard. Though I would imagine a lower rate for STR's, as occurs in some places (most notably in Seattle, until January, when they tacked on the additional 7% Convention and Trade Center tax for smaller capacity units). Hotels and multi-unit operations use city services much more aggressively than STR's...thus should not be taxed at the same rate. It's important that STR's not be required to follow the same policies referenced in Goal #5, as do large hotels, etc. Reasonable building and safety (the same as for long term rental rules, already established), but as far as accessibility, this would unduly prevent many STR's from existing. Accessibility should be encouraged as a positive advertising/competitive advantage for an STR, but should not be required. Obviously there should be some rules around parking, noise, allowable activity in proximity to neighbors, etc. as STR's should not be pariahs in their locations.

urbanina 2 months ago