ADA Transition Plan

What's happening?

The City of Olympia is committed to providing equal access to its public programs, services, facilities, and activities for all citizens including those with disabilities. To achieve this end, the City is developing an ADA (American with Disabilities Act) Transition Plan in compliance with federal and state law. The ADA Transition Plan intends to:

  • Identify physical and communicative barriers in the City of Olympia’s public facilities that limit the accessibility of its programs, services, or activities to individuals with disabilities;
  • Describe the methods to be used to make the facilities, programs, or activities accessible;
  • Provide a schedule for making necessary modifications to provide better access and achieve compliance; and
  • Identify the public officials responsible for implementation of the plan.

This project builds upon prior completed work to gather inventory data of City facilities, policies, procedures and programming to satisfy the self-evaluation and assessment requirements necessary to developing the ADA Transition Plan.

We need your input!

Have an idea about how to make our City more accessible to people with limited mobility, vision, hearing, or other disabilities? Use the two tools below to help identify ADA barriers in the following areas:

  • City services, programs, and activities
  • City buildings and facilities
  • City public right-of-way (streets and sidewalks)

We would especially value input from:

  • Individuals with disabilities;
  • Senior citizens;
  • Individuals that encounter accessibility barriers such as parents/family members/friends of individuals with disabilities;
  • Members of groups that provide services or transportation to individuals with disabilities;
  • Individuals with experience and knowledge of ADA planning and requirements.

What's next?

After the public input period, a Draft ADA Transition is anticipated to be posted here in May 2020. The draft will be available for public comment before a final draft is submitted to the City Council.


What's happening?

The City of Olympia is committed to providing equal access to its public programs, services, facilities, and activities for all citizens including those with disabilities. To achieve this end, the City is developing an ADA (American with Disabilities Act) Transition Plan in compliance with federal and state law. The ADA Transition Plan intends to:

  • Identify physical and communicative barriers in the City of Olympia’s public facilities that limit the accessibility of its programs, services, or activities to individuals with disabilities;
  • Describe the methods to be used to make the facilities, programs, or activities accessible;
  • Provide a schedule for making necessary modifications to provide better access and achieve compliance; and
  • Identify the public officials responsible for implementation of the plan.

This project builds upon prior completed work to gather inventory data of City facilities, policies, procedures and programming to satisfy the self-evaluation and assessment requirements necessary to developing the ADA Transition Plan.

We need your input!

Have an idea about how to make our City more accessible to people with limited mobility, vision, hearing, or other disabilities? Use the two tools below to help identify ADA barriers in the following areas:

  • City services, programs, and activities
  • City buildings and facilities
  • City public right-of-way (streets and sidewalks)

We would especially value input from:

  • Individuals with disabilities;
  • Senior citizens;
  • Individuals that encounter accessibility barriers such as parents/family members/friends of individuals with disabilities;
  • Members of groups that provide services or transportation to individuals with disabilities;
  • Individuals with experience and knowledge of ADA planning and requirements.

What's next?

After the public input period, a Draft ADA Transition is anticipated to be posted here in May 2020. The draft will be available for public comment before a final draft is submitted to the City Council.


Mark and describe any barriers in the public right-of-way

24 days

You can zoom/scroll or search by address to find locations on the map. Then add (+) pins to mark any physical ADA barriers in the public right-of-way (streets and sidewalks).

You must add a description about each individual barrier/pin. You may also add photos if it helps describe the barrier.

Barriers in the public right-of-way include but are not limited to inaccessible curb ramps, sidewalks and/or pedestrian crossings.


You can zoom/scroll or search by address to find locations on the map. Then add (+) pins to mark any physical ADA barriers in the public right-of-way (streets and sidewalks).

You must add a description about each individual barrier/pin. You may also add photos if it helps describe the barrier.

Barriers in the public right-of-way include but are not limited to inaccessible curb ramps, sidewalks and/or pedestrian crossings.